Our network

Transportation

Air Force to Use Laser-Firing Robots to Strip Paint from Fighters

Air Force to Use Laser-Firing Robots to Strip Paint from Fighters

Air Force Times
by Jeff Schogol

 

In yet another case demonstrating that robots can now do the work humans used to do, the Air Force has ordered a pair of systems that use robots with lasers to strip paint off its F-16 fighters and C-130 cargo planes.

Concurrent Technologies Corp. is lead contractor for the $17 million project, which is expected to go into full use at Hill Air Force Base, Utah, in late 2014, according to those involved with the program. Carnegie Mellon University’s National Robotics Engineering Center in Pittsburgh is a subcontractor for the project.

Overnight Detour Scheduled Near Robins AFB This Week

Overnight Detour Scheduled Near Robins AFB This Week

Georgia Department of Transportation crews are expected to mill and pave ruts in the intersection of Watson Blvd. (SR 247 Connector) and SR 247.

According to a GDOT news release, that roadwork is slated to take place near Robins AFB from 7 p.m. until 7 a.m. Wednesday-Friday, Nov. 28-30.

Drivers will be rerouted nightly onto South Davis Dr. and Russell Parkway to avoid the work zone.

Cold-War Era Missiles Get New Paint at Museum of Aviation

Cold-War Era Missiles Get New Paint at Museum of Aviation

 Warner Robins GA -- The missiles guarding the front lawn of the Museum of Aviation are receiving a new paint job.  The two missiles, a Matador and a Mace, were developed after World War II as “pilotless bombers” and sent overseas to West Germany, Korea and Taiwan.  The Warner Robins Air Logistics Center at Robins Air Force Base had worldwide logistics management responsibility for the missiles throughout their service life. 

Hannah Road Scheduled to Reopen Next Week

Hannah Road Scheduled to Reopen Next Week

by Jenny Gordon
Robins Public Affairs

Traffic Delays No Reason to Stall

Traffic Delays No Reason to Stall

by Col. Mitchel Butikofer 
Installation Commander

Getting onto Robins has never been easy. 

That's partly by design. 

The base, like most Air Force and other U.S. military installations, has always worked hard to keep out those who have no business being here in order to provide the safest environment possible. That has included continually reviewing and updating the rules surrounding base access. 

For instance, among other things persons with DoD ID Cards must now be registered in the Defense Biometric Identification System or DBIDS, or, while those without DoD ID cards are allowed to come on the base 'unescorted,' but only after undergoing a background check. 

The base has never been safer. Since July, we've denied access to more than 500 people with criminal convictions, and detained 35 with active warrants. 

However, the traffic delays are also due, in part, to simple math. 

On an average day, about 27,000 vehicles enter Robins. Most enter between 5:30 and 7:30 a.m., with the highest numbers between 5:45 and 6 a.m., 6:45 and 7 a.m. and 7:15 and 7:30 a.m. 

F-15 Upgrades Aim to Double Service Life

F-15 Upgrades Aim to Double Service Life

 

The Air Force Times by Brian Everstine

The Air Force first began flying the F-15 Eagle about 40 years ago, and with delays to the fifth-generation fleet and a continued need for fighters in the air, the service plans to keep the aircraft in service for years to come.

The Air Force plans several upgrades: F-15C and F-15E Strike Eagles are both set to receive new radars, radios and helmets, along with structural integrity tests aimed at almost doubling the service life of the aircraft.

B-52 Turns 60, But Has Lots of Life Left

B-52 Turns 60, But Has Lots of Life Left

 

The Air Force Times by Jeff Schogol

The B-52 is celebrating a big birthday this year — 60 — but unlike humans who feel the aches and pains of aging, the aircraft remains a premiere bombing machine that is expected to continue giving bad guys a real bad day through the 2040s, thanks to yet another upgrade.