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High Profile Bills Pass on 'Crossover Day' in Ga Legislature

Georgia lawmakers closed "Crossover Day" with the passage of several high profile bills Thursday.

Senate voted to ban Georgia law enforcement agencies from setting minimum waiting periods before they act on a reported missing persons case. That's Senate Bill 13. It will now go to the house.

Lawmakers in the House approved a plan to lower grade requirements for those seeking HOPE grants to attend the state's technical colleges. They voted 169 to 1 to send it to the Senate. 

The bill would return the qualifying grade point average to 2.0.

Sequester Would End Flyovers at Sports Events

Sequester Would End Flyovers at Sports Events

 

Gary Mihoces
USA Today

We’ve oohed and aahed at the vroom of military jets flying over sporting events. That will be silenced if the federal budget cuts of sequestration are fully implemented.

Senate Rejects Sequester Alternatives

by Susan Davis, USA Today

STORY HIGHLIGHTS

  • The U.S. Senate rejected both a Republican and Democratic alternative to avoid deep spending cuts
  • Congressional leaders head to the White House Friday for a last ditch effort for compromise
  • $85 billion in across-the-board spending cuts kick in Friday through Sept. 30

WASHINGTON - The U.S. Senate failed to pass both Republican and Democratic alternatives to head off across-the-board spending cuts, further ensuring Washington will blow past a Friday deadline to avoid or replace $85 billion in cuts that threaten economic growth, military readiness and jobs.

Military to Spend More on Care Under Sequester

Military to Spend More on Care Under Sequester

 

By Gregg Zoroya
USA Today

Sweeping budget cuts going into effect Friday create a paradox for military medicine: spending money to save money, Army, Navy and Air Force medical officials say.

As thousands of civilian medical workers are furloughed because of the “sequester,” patients will be sent to private doctors at public expense to receive timely medical care, according to the military medical officials.

Obama Warns Sequester Will Cause Job Losses

WASHINGTON (AP) - President Barack Obama is warning that "people will lose their jobs" if across-the-board budget cuts take effect as scheduled next week.

Obama says the $85 billion in cuts - known as the sequester - are "severe" and says they won't help the economy and won't create jobs.

Obama is calling the across-the-board cuts a "meat cleaver" approach to reducing the deficit. He says the cuts would impact the nation's military readiness and investment in areas like education.

He's calling on Republicans to back a plan proposed by Senate Democrats that would offset the sequester through a combination of increased tax revenue and targeted budget cuts. GOP lawmakers are opposed to more tax revenue, saying Obama got the tax increases he wanted during the "fiscal cliff" negotiations.

(Copyright 2013 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.)

 

Obama Addresses Afghanistan, DoD Budget in SOTU

Obama Addresses Afghanistan, DoD Budget in SOTU

Air Force Times
By Rick Maze

 

President Obama’s State of the Union pledge to reduce by half the number of U.S. troops in Afghanistan within a year drew quick complaints from a top House Republican.

“By the end of next year, our war in Afghanistan will be over,” Obama said before Congress in a televised address. “After a decade of grinding war, our brave men and women in uniform are coming home.”

Reps. Bishop and Scott React to State of the Union

Two Congressmen who represent Central Georgia responded Tuesday night to the President's State of the Union Address with fundamentally different views on how effective the Commander in Chief was.

Republican U.S. Rep. Austin Scott, District 8, said he was disappointed in what he called a lack of specifics.

"We didn't get to hear more about his specific plans to undo the sequester that he signed," Congressman Scott said. "That is going to have such a devastating effect on our military," he added, referring to the string of cuts that would hit the Pentagon's budget March 1, if Congress doesn't intervene.

He also felt President Obama missed an opportunity to heal wounds from the weeks-long fiscal cliff standoff.