Our network

Bergdahl's attorney also fought for Army captain in espionage case


Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl has retained a high-profile attorney — the same lawyer who defended Capt. James Yee, a Muslim Army chaplain cleared in an espionage probe a decade ago.

Bergdahl's lawyer is Eugene Fidell, a Yale Law School scholar, prominent military legal expert and a co-founder and former president of the National Institute of Military Justice.

The Army is investigating the circumstances that led to Bergdahl's disappearance and capture, probing allegations that Bergdahl walked off his remote post in Afghanistan without authorization before militants seized him. After five years in captivity, Bergdahl was freed May 31 as part of a controversial exchange with the Taliban for five militants who were in detention at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba.

Community Sponsors

Are you interested in promoting your business to local customers?

Senate panel votes to keep A-10 flying

Senate panel votes to keep A-10 flying

The Senate Appropriations defense subcommittee has joined the House and the Senate Armed Services committees in protecting the A-10.

The subcommittee, in approving its version of the fiscal 2015 defense spending bill on Tuesday, included $338 million to maintain the A-10 fleet, which the Air Force has proposed cutting to save money.

The bill now goes to the full Senate Appropriations Committee for approval. Both the Senate and House Armed Services committees authorized funding for the A-10 in their versions of the fiscal 2015 National Defense Authorization Act.

The House Appropriations Committee, however, voted June 10 to block an amendment protecting the A-10. The amendment, offered by Rep. Jack Kingston, R-Ga., would have transferred $339.3 million from other parts of the Air Force's operations and maintenance budget to keep the jet flying.

Minimal Impact from Reserve Cuts


The Air Force Reserve Command Headquarters at Robins will lose 258 positions, but that doesn't mean 258 pink slips.

The Secretary of the Air Force announced a new round of budget-cutting Monday.

Some say that may not hit Robins Air Force Base as hard as it sounds.

Chrissy Miner, Interim CEO of the 21st Century Partnership, echoed comments from an Air Force Reserve spokesman.

She said many of the cuts there, may not mean actual workers losing jobs.

While still a loss to the community, many could come from unfilled vacancies.

Miner said, "If there is somebody in that job they might offer them some early retirement incentives, or separation incentives, or they might move them to another job. But bottom line, 258 jobs that could have been there, won't be there anymore."

Georgia Writers Museum hosts Amateur Writing Contest

Georgia Writers Museum hosts Amateur Writing Contest

The Georgia Writers Museum is accepting written work for their Creative Writing Contest.

Deadline to enter is August 15.

Full details:

Community Sponsors

Are you interested in promoting your business to local customers?

Are you up for the Fit-For-Life Challenege?

Are you up for the Fit-For-Life Challenege?

HCBOE offering free adult computer classes

HCBOE offering free adult computer classes

HOUSTON COUNTY, GA – The Houston County Board of Education (HCBOE) will offer basic computer classes free of charge to adults again this coming school year.  The classes are taught by employee and student volunteers. 

Seven sessions of two classes each will be offered at seven different schools.  Classes will begin on the following dates:  Aug. 18, Sept. 8, Sept. 22, Oct. 20, Nov. 3, Jan 12 and Feb. 2.  The training is from 4:30 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. on Monday evenings.  Each site will accept a maximum of 56 participants with the exception of the Crossroads Center which is limited to 22 participants.  The schedule follows. 

F-35 cleared for flight


FARNBOROUGH, ENGLAND — The F-35 might make it to Farnborough after all.

A Pentagon official told Defense News that the F-35 fighter fleet has been cleared by air worthiness authorities. A decision on attending the show has not been made but the official said DoD is "hopeful" it can make the trip.

A statement released by Rear Admiral John Kirby, Pentagon Press Secretary, confirmed the news.

"Yesterday the air worthiness authorities for the U.S. Navy and U.S. Air Force approved the F-35 fleet to return to flight," Kirby said in the statement. "This is a limited flight clearance that includes an engine inspection regimen and a restricted flight envelope which will remain in effect until the root cause of the June 23 engine mishap is identified and corrected."