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5th MOB earns Air Force Meritorius Unit Award

5th MOB earns Air Force Meritorius Unit Award

ROBINS AIR FORCE BASE, Ga. – The 5th Combat Communications Group has received its second Air Force Meritorious Unit Award.  The 5th CCG, also known as the 5th "MOB," has won numerous unit awards, but the Meritorious Unit Award is unique because it specifically honors service in direct support of combat operations.

Created by the Secretary of the Air Force in 2004, the Meritorious Unit Award recognizes units for service either in a combat zone or directly in support of combat operations.

The award is given to units that display "outstanding devotion and superior performance of exceptionally difficult tasks as to set it apart and above other units with similar missions." 

The award recognized the 5th MOB's efforts from 5 Oct 2011 to 4 Oct 2013.  During this period, the MOB logged over 32,000 deployed man-days across 27 sites in 14 nations.

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MGSC to host Sky Camp

MGSC to host Sky Camp

Sky Camp, a summer aviation camp for kids ages 10 to 14, is set for June 30 to July 2 at the Eastman Campus of Middle Georgia State College.

Activities will include exploring weather, history and physics as they relate to flight; aircraft maintenance, building and launching rockets and gliders; flying in an aircraft and more. Fee is $100 per child; $75 for children of Middle Georgia State employees.

For more information, contact Andrea Yawn at andrea.yawn@mga.edu or (478) 374-6700 or Christy Faulk at christy.faulk@mga.edu or (478) 448-4703.

Campus maps and directions: http://www.mga.edu/about/maps.aspx

Military appeals courts upholding sexting convictions

Military appeals courts upholding sexting convictions

Air Force Times

Troops have gotten in trouble for years for sending sexually explicit photos and messages over text message — even without much legal precedent.

Now, several decisions handed down by appeals courts in recent months demonstrate how military law is catching up to technological phenomena of "sexting" and text-stalking, say attorneys who specialize in military justice.

In what is perhaps the service's most notorious sexting case, the Air Force Court of Criminal Appeals ruled in February a superior officer's raunchy texts to younger enlisted airmen supported a charge of maltreatment, even if the subordinate airmen sent similar messages in return.

William Gurney, the former command chief who spent four months in jail before he left the Air Force with a bad conduct discharge for those and other misdeeds, had asked the appeals court to reconsider the charge.

McMahon to lead C-17 group at Robins

McMahon to lead C-17 group at Robins


Retired Maj. Gen. Bob McMahon's next step has been announced, a week after he said he was stepping down as president and CEO of the 21st Century Partnership for another opportunity.

McMahon has been named the Director of C-17 Field Operations at Robins Air Force Base, according to an email release from Boeing Vice President and C-17 Program Manager Gus Urzua and Warner Robins Chamber of Commerce President Morgan Law.

McMahon will oversee business operations and more than 1,000 employees around the globe.

He is a former commander of the Warner Robins Air Logistics Center at Robins.

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Lawmakers ready to block A-10 cuts

Lawmakers ready to block A-10 cuts

Air Force Times

Lawmakers in both the House and Senate are planning legislation to block the Air Force's plans to retire the A-10.

The announcement comes during a week of contentious dialogue between the Air Force and Congress, with lawmakers alleging that the service is breaking the law by cutting back A-10 flying hours and by inflating its estimate of savings possible by retiring the A-10. Air Force officials say they are frustrated with lawmakers' offbase claims that the service does not care about the close air support mission, or about the lives of service members on the ground whom the A-10 protects.

RELATED: Boeing Macon plant makes wings for A-10

Report details Air Force plans for future drones

Report details Air Force plans for future drones

Air Force Times

The Air Force next month will finally reach the target number of 65 combat air patrols for its Predator and Reaper fleet, while the administration seeks to cut back on its drone operations in theater.

The Air Force's long-term outlook for its remotely piloted aircraft fleet was released Friday, and includes insights into how future generations of unmanned systems will take on some missions exclusively flown by manned aircraft today, along with the current state of drone operations.

The report, called the "RPA Vector," states that in May the Air Force will reach 65 round-the-clock combat air patrols, a number required by then-Defense Secretary Robert Gates while the U.S. was still in Iraq. The 65 total patrols will be split between the service's two main drones — 33 flown by the MQ-1B Predator and 32 by the MQ-9 Reaper.

Early retirement revoked for some airmen, leads to White House petition

Early retirement revoked for some airmen, leads to White House petition

Air Force Times

The Air Force revoked some airmen's approvals for early retirement over the weekend, causing outrage online and sparking a petition to the White House.

One airman, who had previously been approved for Temporary Early Retirement Authority and asked not to be identified in print, forwarded the April 5 email to Air Force Times.

"We apologize for the confusion; however, your retirement application was approved erroneously," the email said. "The Air Force Personnel Center has approved the maximum allowable voluntary applications for your AFSC [Air Force specialty code]/grade, or your AFSC/grade has been removed from eligibility for this year's programs due to adjustments to manpower requirements. So your application is being returned."

The email also said the airman is no longer eligible for any voluntary or involuntary force management programs this year.